Posted by Marc Couture, Curtiss-Wright Defense Solutions

Signal Processing Types

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Here's the problem: Your unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is flying through densely populated geography when one of its signal intelligence (SIGINT) systems' radio-frequency (RF) channels detects an emitter signal of interest on a specific frequency, indicating a potential target. It's not enough to know there's a potential threat out there somewhere. You need to know the threat's exact location, and you need to know it in near-real-time. The challenge is that to geolocate a particular emitter, the SIGINT system needs to reassign three or four of its other RF channels, so they can - along with the original channel - perform the interferometry, using TDOA [Time Difference of Arrival] localization techniques, that's needed to zero in on the potential target.[Continue reading →]

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Signal Processing COTS Standards

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Intel's new Xeon D system-on-chip (SoC) is making large numbers of x86 processing cores readily available for embedded defense applications. With an architecture designed to support math-intensive processing and very-high-bandwidth data transfers, the Xeon D enables advanced cognitive electronic warfare (EW) applications to operate in small size, weight, and power (SWaP)-constrained platforms.

Unlike conventional radar systems, new software-defined digitally programmable radars are able to generate previously unencountered waveforms that do not match known waveforms and pulse trains already on an EW system’s pulse descriptor word (PDW) list. The PDW typically contains all the collected data for a specific pulse, including time of arrival (TOA); angle; pulse width, power, and frequency (superhet); or frequency band. In order to defeat never-before-seen waveforms, system designers are developing a new generation of cognitive EW systems that are able to quickly adapt to changes in the radio frequency (RF) environment and almost instantly make decisions about how to respond to unfamiliar threats. [Continue reading →]

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OpenVPX

 
Article

Intel's new Xeon D system-on-chip (SoC) is making large numbers of x86 processing cores readily available for embedded defense applications. With an architecture designed to support math-intensive processing and very-high-bandwidth data transfers, the Xeon D enables advanced cognitive electronic warfare (EW) applications to operate in small size, weight, and power (SWaP)-constrained platforms.

Unlike conventional radar systems, new software-defined digitally programmable radars are able to generate previously unencountered waveforms that do not match known waveforms and pulse trains already on an EW system’s pulse descriptor word (PDW) list. The PDW typically contains all the collected data for a specific pulse, including time of arrival (TOA); angle; pulse width, power, and frequency (superhet); or frequency band. In order to defeat never-before-seen waveforms, system designers are developing a new generation of cognitive EW systems that are able to quickly adapt to changes in the radio frequency (RF) environment and almost instantly make decisions about how to respond to unfamiliar threats. [Continue reading →]

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