Posted by John McHale, Editorial Director

Signal Processing Applications

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Funding requested for Department of Defense (DoD) Major Defense Acquisition Programs (MDAPs) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 totals $94.9 billion, more than $17 billion dollars over the FY 2017 request, making up 46 percent of the Trump administration's $208.6 billion FY 2018 acquisition budget request.[Continue reading →]

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Modern radar and electronic warfare designs rely heavily on embedded computing systems that leverage high-speed commercial processors and FPGAs to find every target or signal and enable the warfighter to respond in real time. Meanwhile, signal processing system designers are cutting costs by using parallel compute platforms such as OpenCL that work across multiple chip platforms.[Continue reading →]

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Designers of signal-processing systems for electronic warfare (EW) applications faced with requirements for reduced size, weight, and power (SWaP) along with more processing power are creating multifunction systems that leverage high-speed field-programmable gate array (FPGA) technology.

Electronic warfare, for decades, has been a kingdom rife with customized systems and stovepipe technology based on closed architectures. As enemy threats become more sophisticated, EW designers face pressure to create systems that can adapt and respond effectively in real time. Their efforts are resulting in multifunction systems that marry different types of EW, such as signals intelligence (SIGINT) and electronic intelligence (ELINT), as well as EW and radar functions in one box.[Continue reading →]

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[Application Feature]Radar, electronic warfare steadier parts of military market

By John McHale, Editorial Director[Continue reading →]

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High density power electronics with high efficiencies – typically more than 90 percent – are becoming the defacto requirement for high-end mission critical military platforms such as radar, fighter jets, UAVs, and weapon systems where size, weight, and power are limited. Meanwhile, Gallium Nitride based RF components are beginning to populate military RF applications.[Continue reading →]

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Cost pressures and consumer handheld technology increasingly drive rugged wearable computer designs for warfighter applications. Meanwhile, new ISR requirements for full motion video are pushing rugged display designers to innovate image enhancement technology.[Continue reading →]

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Cost pressures and consumer handheld technology increasingly drive rugged wearable computer designs for warfighter applications. Meanwhile, new ISR requirements for full motion video are pushing rugged display designers to innovate image enhancement technology.[Continue reading →]

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Signal Processing COTS Standards

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Leaders of PICMG say that their standards continue to grow in adoption across the globe, with COM Express making huge inroads in Asia and Internet of Things (IoT) markets while CompactPCI Serial grows in acceptance in Europe.[Continue reading →]

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Summer ended with sad news for our OpenSystems Media family when we learned that our friend and coworker, Joe Pavlat, Editorial Director of PICMG Technologies magazine, passed away suddenly at his home in Grass Valley, California. He was only 63 years old.[Continue reading →]

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OpenVPX

 
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Modern radar and electronic warfare designs rely heavily on embedded computing systems that leverage high-speed commercial processors and FPGAs to find every target or signal and enable the warfighter to respond in real time. Meanwhile, signal processing system designers are cutting costs by using parallel compute platforms such as OpenCL that work across multiple chip platforms.[Continue reading →]

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Article

High density power electronics with high efficiencies – typically more than 90 percent – are becoming the defacto requirement for high-end mission critical military platforms such as radar, fighter jets, UAVs, and weapon systems where size, weight, and power are limited. Meanwhile, Gallium Nitride based RF components are beginning to populate military RF applications.[Continue reading →]

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Welcome to our 2014 Radar Issue. Why have an issue focused on radar? Simple: the radar market, along with Electronic Warfare (EW), shows the most promise for embedded-computing system designs.[Continue reading →]

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High density power electronics with high efficiencies – typically more than 90 percent – are becoming the defacto requirement for high-end mission critical military platforms such as radar, fighter jets, UAVs, and weapon systems where size, weight, and power are limited. Meanwhile, Gallium Nitride based RF components are beginning to populate military RF applications.[Continue reading →]

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Signal Processing Types

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Welcome to our 2015 Radar Issue. Once again we have started off the year with an issue focused on radar because embedded signal processing solutions are what drives the bandwidth in modern military radar systems and electronic warfare designs – two of the hottest areas in the defense electronics market.

The market for radar is especially strong and looks to stay that way. For example, for the radar/lidar there were 79 awards in 2013 totaling $4 billion with Raytheon leading the way, says Brad Curran, senior industry analyst at Frost & Sullivan. Through September 2014 there were 41 awards totaling $2 billion, he adds. “2014 is skewed with Lockheed Martin winning the $914 million Space Fence contract in June. The big money for radar is still in missile defense, which is proliferating. Secondly, funding for F-35 radar and upgrades to radars for other fighter jets – that cannot afford the F-35 radar – will be steady.” [Continue reading →]

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Welcome to our 2014 Radar Issue. Why have an issue focused on radar? Simple: the radar market, along with Electronic Warfare (EW), shows the most promise for embedded-computing system designs.[Continue reading →]

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Radiation immunity and signal processing requirements are increasing for spacecraft and satellite electronic systems as designers look to add more capability for government and civilian applications. Meanwhile, the U.S. military and commercial markets for space electronics remain flat, thanks to the slow global economy and government budget cuts.[Continue reading →]

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Modern radar and electronic warfare designs rely heavily on embedded computing systems that leverage high-speed commercial processors and FPGAs to find every target or signal and enable the warfighter to respond in real time. Meanwhile, signal processing system designers are cutting costs by using parallel compute platforms such as OpenCL that work across multiple chip platforms.[Continue reading →]

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Signal Processing Techniques

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Modern radar and electronic warfare designs rely heavily on embedded computing systems that leverage high-speed commercial processors and FPGAs to find every target or signal and enable the warfighter to respond in real time. Meanwhile, signal processing system designers are cutting costs by using parallel compute platforms such as OpenCL that work across multiple chip platforms.[Continue reading →]

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